8 Ways to Build Credibility in Your Next Meeting

8 Ways to Build Credibility in Your Next Meeting

Have you ever gone into a meeting expecting to get results only to be bogged down by objections?

Have you ever wondered how some people get everything approved and why you're still sitting there answering twenty questions?

Or, are you the type who can get your ideas approved with little resistance?

In each of these situations, the amount of difficulty is correlated with credibility. That is, the level of trust your team, your peers, or your managers have in you and your ideas dictates how easily you can do business.

If you have low credibility, your life will be unnecessarily hard. I'm going to show you how to change that.

Build credibility 1 wide

A few months ago I shared with you how I lost some credibility at home. I mentioned what I had done right, what I had done wrong, and what I would do better next time in order to repair that credibility.

The importance of credibility comes up all the time. Whether you're in a business meeting, mastermind group, or hanging out with friends, there will always be people wondering if you're going to do what you say you're going to do.

But, if you have a high level of credibility, your life will be much easier.

Without credibility life is harder, work gets done slower, and everything is more frustrating! (Tweet that if you know what I mean!)

To me, credibility is equated to trust. If you have a high level of credibility, you have a high level of trust. And vice versa.

If you have a track record of producing results and a history of credibility, you can get more done, get better results, and work faster along the way because you face fewer road blocks.

Some of the ways I've built credibility with you are consistent blogging, starting a podcast, and getting to know my readers on a one on one level (if I'm able!)

Yet, if you are in a boardroom, a classroom, or a team meeting, how do you build credibility?

8 Ways to Build Credibility

1: Be relevant.

ADD has no place in your team meetings. Stay on track and focused.

If you're always blurting out irrelevant ideas or floating off topic, your credibility will float right out the window.

2: Think about the big picture.

One of the best ways to build credibility is to show you can think beyond the task at hand or outside your current role on the team.

The person who can articulate how their part fits into the larger puzzle is sometimes a rare find. Be that person and build your credibility.

3: Show with actions don't tell with words.

Like my momma told me, actions speak louder than words. Just because we aren't on the playground anymore doesn't make this less true.

Remembering my corporate job, I can count on one hand the number of people who followed up with me after they told me they would. Be the kind of person people remember because you followed through.

4: Connect people.

My friend Jared connects people better than almost anyone I've ever seen. Because of his ability to connect people, he's become an extremely valuable person to know.

If you can connect resources, people, or technical expertise to the people who need it, you'll become the linchpin Seth Godin told us about.

5: Think like a business person.

The person who knows how to move the team forward is valuable to any business. And they're especially valuable to me.

You don't have to know the ins-and-outs of profit and loss, but you should know what pays the bills.

If you can show your team you know what the business needs and can move it forward in an ethical way, you'll stand out as someone they can rely on.

6: Do What You Say You Will Do.

DWYSYWD, the acronym for doing what you say you'll do, is something I've written about no less than seven times.

By living up to your commitments you'll stand head and shoulders above most people.

If you find yourself in the unfortunate situation of having over-committed, read this.

7: Do more than you're asked.

You can easily build credibility by doing more than what you were asked to do.

See, there are two types of people who get noticed at the office, the people who do as little as possible and the people who over deliver on a consistent basis. Be known for the latter.

8: Get results.

Getting results shows follow-through, it shows you're capable of collecting necessary resources and focusing on a goal. Without results, it's impossible to be credible.

Building credibility isn't always easy. But anything worth doing in life is worth doing well.

When it comes to credibility I have learned if you put in the effort up front, you will reap the rewards later. If you build credibility today, you can move with greater velocity tomorrow. (Tweet that!)

These are eight of the things I've done to build (and rebuild) credibility and I've seen massive success. I know they'll work for you as well!

Question: What is your best tip for building credibility? Share a tip with me in the comments below.

 

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  • #6 is incredibly important. In organizations large and small, in order to function properly, everyone has to do what they say they are going to do. Otherwise, tasks fall behind, people don’t have what they need to do their jobs, and the company as a whole struggles. To me, not doing what you say you’re going to do is the easiest way to lose credibility and influence, because you lose trust.

    Great list, Ellory.

    • You’re so right Ryan, I think #6 is my favorite too.

      Anything you’d add to the list?

      • It’s already a great list, so I don’t have much to add. The one thing I would say is that you also have to be engaged, or at least appear to be engaged. People who look like they’re not paying attention tend not to inspire trust in their decisions.

        Imagine if a coworker came in and suggested a radically different course of action, although for the last 3 meetings they were more interested in playing with their phone than adding to the discussion. Even if they were paying attention, and their idea was good, I wouldn’t have faith in them simply because I thought they weren’t interested in being involved and didn’t understand all of the factors at play.

  • #6 is incredibly important. In organizations large and small, in order to function properly, everyone has to do what they say they are going to do. Otherwise, tasks fall behind, people don’t have what they need to do their jobs, and the company as a whole struggles. To me, not doing what you say you’re going to do is the easiest way to lose credibility and influence, because you lose trust.

    Great list, Ellory.

    • You’re so right Ryan, I think #6 is my favorite too.

      Anything you’d add to the list?

      • It’s already a great list, so I don’t have much to add. The one thing I would say is that you also have to be engaged, or at least appear to be engaged. People who look like they’re not paying attention tend not to inspire trust in their decisions.

        Imagine if a coworker came in and suggested a radically different course of action, although for the last 3 meetings they were more interested in playing with their phone than adding to the discussion. Even if they were paying attention, and their idea was good, I wouldn’t have faith in them simply because I thought they weren’t interested in being involved and didn’t understand all of the factors at play.

  • kentsanders says:

    Great post, Ellory. In today’s world where everyone is connected, it’s so important to build trust with people. Your reputation can be destroyed very quickly if you don’t have trust.

  • Great post, Ellory. In today’s world where everyone is connected, it’s so important to build trust with people. Your reputation can be destroyed very quickly if you don’t have trust.

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